A Q&A With Digital Media Investors Part II: Advice for Digital Media Companies

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As noted in Part I: Digital Media Funding Trends, Foley Partner Beth Felder gathered a group of digital media investor experts – Don Dodge, Developer Advocate for Google, James Geshwiler, Managing Director of CommonAngels and Eric Hjerpe, Partner at Kepha Partners – at our 2014 FOLEYTech Summit for a discussion on digital media investing. We’ve compiled their top insights below.

Since the paid subscription model is substantially dead, what is a successful revenue model for a digital media company?

Almost all digital media companies use a channel strategy for acquiring customers. The most successful find a channel partner willing to pay the digital media company to provide services to customers that the channel partner has already established and delivers. In the early stages sometimes digital media companies just have to find ways to drive revenue, even if they aren’t pursuing directly their long-term strategy. Investors want to find companies that have a plan for revenue that offset investment dollars such that the company can self-sustain operating expenses and focus investment on expansion and growth.

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A Q&A With Digital Media Investors Part I: Digital Media Funding Trends

Financing-Issues-Icon_dark

Foley Partner Beth Felder gathered a group of digital media investor experts – Don Dodge, Developer Advocate for Google, James Geshwiler, Managing Director of CommonAngels and Eric Hjerpe, Partner at Kepha Partners – at our 2014 FOLEYTech Summit for a discussion on digital media investing. We’ve compiled their top insights below.

What do we mean by digital media?

Digital media has a broad definition; one way to think about digital media is to compare it with software. A party pays for an end product in software, whereas in digital media a user pays for access to the platform. However it is not uncommon in the industry for a company to pivot from being software-based to digital media-based. It is important to note that digital media also frequently includes business-to-business (B2B) solutions.

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Big Companies Should Think and Act Like Startups to Keep Data Safe

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With data security breaches now a shockingly common part of modern life, businesses of all sizes are scrambling to bolster their defenses.

In this guest commentary in the Boston Business Journal, we explain how businesses can fight against data breaches by taking tips from startups, and even the hackers themselves. Here’s how:

  • Think opportunity, not crisis. Intrepid entrepreneurs view data security gaps as an opportunity to innovate. Data breaches present an opportunity to find new ways to use technology freely without exposing personal or corporate data. Continue reading this entry

Entrepreneurs: The New Wave of Immigrants

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In the last ten years, the number of US companies started by foreign-born entrepreneurs has skyrocketed. From Google, Facebook, LinkedIn, Zip Car and Tesla, foreign-born founders created some of the most successful US companies. Indeed, whereas before 2006 approximately 20% of venture-backed public companies were founded by immigrants, from 2006 to 2012, this percentage grew to 33%. Continue reading this entry

Navigating Employment-Based Visas for Startups

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Startups often seek to hire highly educated employees with degrees in STEM (science, technology, engineering and science) fields in order to compete with their established competitors. Post-graduate international students have emerged as the leading source of talent for startups as nearly 1/3 of all international students (or over 330,000 such students) are enrolled in STEM degree programs at U.S. Universities. However, the lack of a true “startup visa” makes hiring post-graduate international students and other foreign nationals alike difficult. Generally speaking, the three most common employment-based visas used to staff emerging companies are the H-1B, E-2, L-1 visa categories. This article briefly describes the three most common pitfalls related to the above-mentioned employment-based visa categories as they relate to startups. Continue reading this entry